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Sree Sreenivasan on how to start a new venture during lockdown

by Chris Taylor | Oct. 13, 2020

NEW YORK (Reuters) - When Diane Leonard checked in to a conference the other day, the routine was familiar: Watching keynote speakers, interacting with other attendees, bumping into friends.

One key difference: The grantwriter was at home in Clayton, New York, with her favorite black coffee, treadmill desk and mini goldendoodle, Ollie.

 

Like many gatherings this year, the tech conference for nonprofit professionals by Blackbaud, a cloud computing provider, was fully virtual.


“I’d say I have been to more than 40 of these over the last six months,” Leonard said. “It’s become a way of life.”

In Meeting Professionals International’s summer survey, 86% of respondents foresaw declining attendance for live events over the coming year, while 87% projected an increase for virtual ones.


“In six months of running virtual events, I’ve found that they are about 20% different from real-life conferences – but it’s a critical 20%,” said Sree Sreenivasan, co-founder of digital consultancy Digimentors, which produces TV-quality virtual events...

“Think of it as an opportunity to do things you couldn’t do before,” said Sreenivasan. “Before, these events took place behind closed doors, with high ticket prices, in faraway places.
 

Now, every day, dozens of fascinating people around the world are available to talk about issues of great importance. You can tour the world and listen to interesting people all day long.”

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